❴Reading❵ ➿ Foghorn (Classics Stories of Ray Bradbury) Author Ray Bradbury – Dolove.info

Foghorn (Classics Stories of Ray Bradbury) I sat there wishing there was something I could say. A super creepy tale about what is in the fog. Best Books, Foghorn Classics Stories Of Ray Bradbury Author Ray Bradbury This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book Foghorn Classics Stories Of Ray Bradbury , Essay By Ray Bradbury Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For Please Read And Make A Refission For You One day many years ago a man walked along and stood in the sound of the ocean on a cold sunless shore and said We need a voice to call across the water, to warn ships I ll make one I ll make a voice that is like an empty bed beside you all night long, and like an empty house when you open the door, and like the trees in autumn with no leaves A sound like the birds flying south, crying, and a sound like November wind and the sea on the hard, cold shore I ll make a sound that s so alone that no one can miss it, that whoever hears it will weep in their souls, and to all who hear it in the distant towns I ll make me a sound and an apparatus and they ll call it a Fog Horn and whoever hears it will know the sadness of eternity and the briefness of life Just amazing What a beautiful story Two men, a lonely lighthouse with its fog horn and the creature it calls Truly a beautiful little story. Cold, chilling, mysterious Amazing short story Although I am not a big fan of short stories, this one was fairly enjoyable It is one of three lovely volumes I found at our library shop This one is about a lighthouse with a fog horn which attracts a sea monster believing he has found a mate Imaginative. HauntingA short story by Bradbury which evokes a measure of Lovecraft, embracing the mysterious and unfathomable yet, without the horror. I don t usually read science fiction It s a reflex action I see something labeled as SF and look for something else I don t even have a shelf for such genre That kind of stuff goes right to the loneliest shelf, the place for the uncategorizable Today, after reading many lines brimming with the kind of profound and thought provoking lyricism that always leads to the wonders of introspection, I found by chance this short story by Bradbury, which was included in The Golden Apples of the Sun a collection I already added to my massive to read list since I loved this one I ve only read Fahrenheit 451, a book I should return to someday to refresh my memories And on this clear day tinged with a little wistfulness, on this sun drenched Sunday afternoon that I spent at home since I didn t care much for the outside world today, I found this Bradbury mentioned on some list by a bookshop I follow on Twitter Now, that would be different ah, what the hell, let s immerse ourselves in a fantastic world full of adventures and a few laughs, perhaps, away from this dominical heaviness , I thought without a clue, clearly And read The Fog Horn.The Fog Horn blew.The monster answered.I saw it all, I knew it all the million years of waiting alone, for someone to come back who never came back The million years of isolation at the bottom of the sea, the insanity of time there, while the skies cleared of reptile birds, the swamps fried on the continental lands, the sloths and sabre tooths had there day and sank in tar pits, and men ran like white ants upon the hills The monster was only a hundred yards off now, it and the Fog Horn crying at each other As the lights hit them, the monster s eyes were fire and ice, fire and ice That s life for you, said McDunn Someone always waiting for someone who never comes home Always someone loving some thing than that thing loves them And after a while you want to destroy whatever that thing is, so it can hurt you no The monster was rushing at the lighthouse.The Fog Horn blew.Wrong again, kiddo And no answer.Feb 25, 18 Maybe later on my blog. One day many years ago a man walked along and stood in the sound of the ocean on a cold sunless shore and said We need a voice to call across the water, to warn ships I ll make one I ll make a voice that is like an empty bed beside you all night long, and like an empty house when you open the door, and like the trees in autumn with no leaves A sound like the birds flying south, crying, and a sound like November wind and the sea on the hard, cold shore I ll make a sound that s so alone that no one can miss it, that whoever hears it will weep in their souls, and to all who hear it in the distant towns I ll make me a sound and an apparatus and they ll call it a Fog Horn and whoever hears it will know the sadness of eternity and the briefness of life In an isolated lighthouse, the narrator and his fellow operator, McDunn, keep the light burning, and the fog horn blowing The sea is so old, as old as the beard of a comet , and hides so much And McDunn, who s been at the work for some time, warns his less experienced workmate about how, at a certain time of year tonight, in fact one of the sea s great secrets comes to the surface, drawn by the call of the fog horn and the yearning for some company.When I was a child, we d stand on our doorstep at midnight on New Year s Eve and listen to the sounds of the ships a few miles away in Cork harbour blasting their fog horns as a way of ringing in the new year I remember the strangeness of that sound, and the loneliness of it heavy in the night.Ray Bradbury was one of the first writers to really open me to up the magic of stories, and of language I was probably about ten years old when I first read this one it s the opening story of his collection, The Golden Apples of the Sun , and it thrilled and chilled me then and has remained one of my favourites ever since It s just beautiful told, and Bradbury s language is, as always, a thorough delight sad, eerie and evocative, poetry from the heart and soul I can think of no better way of saying goodnight to 2015 and of welcoming in 2016 than with this one.P.S This story was adapted for the big screen in 1953 as The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms Further, the lighthouse that inspired Bradbury to write it is, supposedly, Galley Head Lighthouse, in Rosscarbery, West Cork about 50 miles from me This might be mere conjecture, but it s a nice thought

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