❰Epub❯ ❧ Theodora: Actress, Empress, Whore Author Stella Duffy – Dolove.info

Theodora: Actress, Empress, Whore Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint NotRetrouvez Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D OccasionTheodora Actress, Empress, Whore DuffyNotRetrouvez Theodora Actress, Empress, Whore Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint Women In AntiquityIn Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint, David Potter Penetrates The Highly Biased Accounts Of Her Found In The Writings Of Her Contemporaries And Takes Advantage Of The Latest Research On Early Byzantium To Craft A Modern, Well Rounded, And Engaging Narrative Of Theodora S Life Theodora Actress, Empress, Whore By Stella Duffy Intensely Seductive As A Provocative Dance, Compelling As Only History Can Be, Theodora Draws The Reader Into The Life Of A Common Actress And Dancer, Who Eventually Became Empress Of Rome As A Child, Theodora Learned The Hard Way Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint By David Stone David Potter S Theodora Actress, Empress, Saint Is A Mesmerizing Biography Of One Of History S Most Influential, And Most Wrongfully Maligned, Women Leaders Much Of The Previous Scholarship On Theodora Relied On The Works Of Her Contemporaries, Who Were Ofteninspired By Personal And Political Vendettas Than Truth Biography Of Empress Theodora, Byzantine Feminist Empress Theodora CJune ,, Wife Of EmperorJustinian I, Is Regarded As The Most Powerful Woman InByzantinehistory Because Of Her Intelligence And Political Savvy, She Was Justinian S Most Trusted Adviser And Used Her Influence To Promote Religious And Social Policies In Line With Her Interests Theodora Actress, Empress, Whore By Stella Duffy Facts About Theodora Byzantine Empress, Theodora Was A Byzantine Empress, Wife Of The Emperor Justinian I And The Most Powerful Woman In Byzantine History Born From Humble Origins, Theodora Reigned Over The Byzantine Empire Alongside Her Husband Fromuntil Her Death InThey Would Rule Together In A Golden Period Of Byzantine History Read This Review & More Like It On My Blog!

3.5 out of 5

Theodora was one of the most influential women of her time. As a povertystricken dancer, as the most celebrated actress/whore in Constantinople, as a penitent nun in a commune in the desert, and as the wife of the most powerful man in Christendom, she commands attention and vast amounts of interest. Defying social strictures and traditions of her day, Theodora rose from a common birth and life to the most exalted position available: Augusta of "New Rome" also known as Constantinople, the "sparkling gem in a Christian crown" in in 527 AD. Stella Duffy writes an easytoread and wellcrafted and rounded tale of the infamous woman in one of the most interesting periods of the Roman Empire.

Born the second daughter of three to Acacius and an unknown woman, named Hypatia for this novel, Theodora was born into showbusiness as it was then. Her father was the bear trainer at the infamuous Hippodrome of Constantinople. It is the Hippodrome that is the most important place in Theodora's life: her earliest memories, the death of her father at the hands of his beloved bear, and eventually the site of the greatest triumph of her life: her coronation. Duffy writes Theodora as a determined, intelligent and capable young woman. Not the best singer, not the best dancer or even the prettiest girl, Theodora commands attention and awe from her presence, her wit, her spirit and her sheer ambition. Though the novel begins at age eleven for the protagonist, it is never immature or boring: I was captivated from the start.With a singer for an older sister (Comito) and a beautiful younger sister (Anastasia), Theo turns to her true talent: comedy. With it she makes a name, a fortune and a life she always believed was beyond her. I liked Theodora a lot: I actually wished this was a firstperson novel rather than third, though I did get to see and enjoy insight into Justinian as well. She was the only female character I enjoyed, the rest seeming rather hardbitten and begrudging of Theodora's success, even her sisters. I enjoyedand believedthe growth and maturity Theodora grows into, especially on her travels from Constantinople. She learns humility, grief and even experiences for the first time a sense of equality while in the desert. For the first time, regardless of her sex or past professions or infamy, Theodora was what she has always sought to be: an equal. It's also terribly interesting to read about a indomitable woman who experiences such a wide range of life: from a whore to a penitent nun in an ascetic community, Theodora remains herself and full of fire. From failed love affairs, to child abandonment issues, Duffy presents Theodora as a complex woman. There is no easy answer to the hows and whys of what Theodora did historically, but the reasons Duffy fabricates/infers are more than adequate and totally believable for her version of the Empress.

Let's talk about Justinian, the Emperor. Presented as a bookish, scholarly but kind man, I initially didn't invest in the relationship between the two. Born Flavius Petrus Sabbatius, he was not from Constantinople, an ambitious "foreigner" with a thirst for power "born of a desire for change." A man of strategy rather than force, Justinian quietly emerged as a strong and very likeable character. While their marriage is portrayed initially as more of an alliance to harbor amity between both sides of the religious debate (they were on openly opposing sides of the heated religious debate), it grew into a nice, steady affection and love. The two characters brought out the best in each other: I liked their dynamic and relationship more and more as the novel progressed through their lives together. There is a nice dichotomy between the eventual August and his Augusta as well: Theo is of the City, poor and therefore "one of the people." Justinian represents the other classes of the varied, multinational Empire: foreigner of the City, rich and royal. Justinian helps Theodora evolve from antigovernment to actually being the government, an interesting and hardly believable tale based on fact.

This is a fairly easy read for a historical novel. I found the prose to be a bit stuffy and overloaded from time to time, the dialogue occasionally stilted and unrealistic, but neither issue overwhelmed my enjoyment of the rest of the book. Constantinople itself was one of my favorite parts of the entire thing: it springs to life as much as Theodora and considerably more than the rest of the characters. It is a vibrant city, teeming with life. Contradictorily the Christian capital of the world but still fighting an internal battle over divinity of the Christ, Constantinople is in a constant flux of religious dogma, a microcosm of the entire empire. With the Western side extolling the belief in Christ's humanity AND divinity and the Eastern parts of the Empire contesting He is wholly divine, a schism seems imminent. Between the religious debates and the constant political turmoil and maneuvering of the Blues and the Green, it's easy to see the cracks in the foundation. Duffy does a more than admirable job of explaining the different opinions/beliefs and the reasons for the tensions in the novel without a massive infodump. I will say I didn't like the jumps in the chronology at all: the barely glossed over times ("in those two years....." "For the next three....") because I was interested in a lot of the events/times skipped over.

Love her, hate her, despise her for her less savory acts but you cannot deny Theodora had an impact. On the world, on her Empire, and on religion. An influential woman who refused to stay in her place and do what she was told, I think many historical fiction fans will have fun with this easytoread, easily enjoyable novel. Her life began and ended at the famed Hippodrome, but Theodora's legacy and memory still reaches out over 1500 years after she died at the age of approximately 48. Interesting enough premise but awkward writinga bit stuffy and bloated. While I was reading, I was engaged enough but every time I put it down, I couldn't find the motivation to pick it back up. Might give it a try again, someday. 4.5 stars

I'm trying to think of a way to describe this book, and "immensely satisfying" is the only descriptor that's coming to mind. That seems so weak, though! "Satisfying" implies justokayness, but Theodora was anything but "just okay."

I think what feels so satisfying about this novel is the realization that fine craftsmanship is still alive and well within historical fiction. Since the success of The Other Boleyn Girl, the general tone of HF has taken a bit of a nosedive as more and more authors (and publishers) strive to replicate that same success. Rather than telling a story that feels true and real, it seems to me that so many have just attempted to put the features of TOBG into whatever historical setting they happen to have on their plate. The result has been nearconsistent disappointment with almost every historical novel I've read for YEARS...at least from larger publishers, who seem to be caught up in this frantic race to find the next TOBG rather than trying to find the next good historical novel. (Of course, this isn't the case for all books I've read since TOBG. It's just hard to recall that sometimes, when the market is so flooded with so many copies of the sameold, sameold.)

So I am very much satisfied, and gratified, and very happy to know that at least Stella Duffy is out there putting her all into her OWN really good historical novel. And this one is really good, and it really feels like it's hers.

It was such an enjoyment for me that I actually don't know where to start in talking about it. One of the things I just loved, loved, loved was the uniqueness of the "lower class" characters' voices. The actresses, whores, animal trainers, and teachereunuchs were remarkably realfeeling, and this was achieved with the PERFECT balance of modernday fourletterwords and turns of phrases, worked very sparingly and deliberately against carefully constructed "sets" of detail and character motivations, voices, and dialogue that felt otherwise entirely a part of 500 C.E. Constantinople. As I write HF myself, I know what a really remarkable feat this is, to make not only individual characters but even entire strata of society feel so vibrant and true. Duffy's great care and forethought in the construction of her worldnot only the place and time but also the societywas evident, and something a fellow writer appreciates and applauds.

The plot itself was perfectly paced. It opens superbly, right in the midst of young Theodora's already rich personality, and the main character's motives and actions feel authentic and logical, given the person she is. For those who know the real history ("real" history in airquotes, as who knows what Procopius's problem was), all the best moments of the true Theodora tales are there, brought to vivid, breathtaking life for the reader. Some moments were heartbreaking; some were laughoutloud funny (I cracked up on the treadmill at the gym over Theodora giving her performance of Leda and the Swan..."Zeus! O God!" hahahah.) Many moments surprised, even for somebody who has a fairly good familiarity with the historical accounts of Theodora and Justinian.

Speaking of which, where gaps existed in the historical accounts, Duffy did a spectacular job of bridging those gaps with plausible scenes, richly detailed and well executed, which linked the known bits of history with stronger and stronger chains as Duffy's skill with character and atmosphere took over.

It was a truly fantastic book, beautiful and rich with superb character work and unforgettable voice. My only regret in reading it is that I was planning my own take on the Theodora story, to be written a couple of years in the future, and I had been tinkering with the idea of using a certain totallyfictional plot device that Duffy already beat me to. NutsI'll have to come up with something else. I can't begrudge such a good author the "theft" of my idea (years before I thought of it, of course!) because her book was such a pleasure to read.

This book was SO CLOSE to being a 5 for me (pretty rare in my historical fiction reads, as I am just as hardnosed about setting and accuracy as any other bigtime HF fan) and I would have joyfully given it five, but for the occasional turn of phrase that pushed the anachronism envelope just a bit too far and plucked me out of the story. But I was only out for a heartbeat, and then I was right back in again.

This one was first published in 2010, if I remember correctly, right at the beginning of the tidal wave of bizarre linguistic discrepancies that has washed over and swamped recent historical fiction. What is UP with publishers doing this to HF? I can only assume it's publishers calling for a "beachier" voice (again, the influence of TOBG), because it's very difficult to imagine that Stella Duffy's otherwise gorgeous prose and careful attention to maintaining proper historical detail and atmosphere would allow for the infiltration of such modern language on its own, without the influence of a publisher who's panicking over an everdiminishing share of the market. (How do you get more readers? Appeal to a wider audience, goes the common thinking, and I guess a wider audience isn't capable of handling realfeeling historical dialogue without the occasional "okay" thrown in...? Oh, publishers. SMH.) Anyway, the rare breach of modern voice wasn't really that bad. It certainly wasn't the most confusingly modernized HF I've read. (It wasn't even the most modernized fiction about Theodora I've read.)

I noted on Stella Duffy's GR author page that HBO has optioned her Theodora novels to potentially produce as a miniseries. YAY! I hope they do, as I've loved HBO's handling of A Song of Ice and Fire (also a series for which I am way too fannish and supernitpicky). It would be a real pleasure to see the same team (or a similar one) bring this book to life on film.

I am downloading the sequel, The Purple Shroud, at this moment and will gleefully carry it off to the gym as soon as I click Save on this review, so I can continue experiencing Duffy's fantastic, artfully portrayed, nearperfect depiction of Constantinople and its amazing Augusta.

Buy it and read it! This is the story of Theodora and her rise from dancer/prostitute to Empress of Rome. The book starts with Theodora working on stage at the Hippodrome and being trained by Menander, a man she feared and loved. After becoming famous she falls in love with Hecebolus and moves to Africa with him. When Hecebolus casts her off for another she flees Africa and finds her way to Alexandria where she finds her faith, looks for forgiveness for her sins, and puts her fate in the hands of Timothy who she respects. Timothy helps her to find her way to Justinian who is preparing to become the next Emporer of Rome.

I really enjoyed this book. Theodora is a fascinating character to read about, there are so many different facets to her personality. At times she is selfish, cruel, and obstinate but she also shows she can be loving and compassionate when she wants to be. I liked her from the beginning of the book and I was hoping things would turn out well for her.

The story moved at a fast pace, there were no slow sections for me in the book at all. The other characters in the book were also very entertaining, I really liked Justinian and Theodora's mentor Menander. There are lots of great descriptions of Constantinople and a fascinating look at the tensions between different religious groups at the time. It was a very volatile time and the rulers were constantly trying to keep the peace with little success.

Being that a large part of the book is about Theodora being on the stage as an actress and being a prostitute their are some difficult scenes in the book that some readers might be uncomfortable with. A lot of bad language is also used throughout the book that might be offensive. I think that if that does not bother you and you like a good historical fiction book about ancient times, you will find this book to be well worth the read.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *